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Sweetnews

Both the American Diabetes Association and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics state that the use of no-calorie sweeteners such as aspartame, saccharin, sucralose, and stevia can be used as a safe tool for diabetes and weight management.1,2

When your coworker stocks the office snack table with fresh caramel apples, or when your son blows out the candles on top of his chocolate birthday cake, it can be hard to resist. Sugary desserts are often high in calories, fat and carbohydrate; but if you have diabetes, they can impact blood sugar levels—making enjoying the occasional dessert a meal planning hassle.

But there’s sweet news: Swapping no-calorie sweeteners for sugar is safe and can give you more flexibility with your food choices and health goals.

No-calorie sweeteners—sometimes referred to as artificial, low-calorie, or noncaloric sweeteners—can be a tool to help you safely manage both your diabetes meal planning and your weight. They give you the sweetness you want with minimal or no carbohydrate per serving. Plus, with few or no calories per serving, they can help with weight management.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several no-calorie sweetening ingredients—including aspartame, acesulfame-K, neotame, saccharin, and sucralose—as safe for consumption. But even so, it’s often hard to separate the truth from the tales. It’s time to set the record straight.

THE TALE:

No-calorie sweeteners may increase your blood sugar levels.

THE TRUTH:

The FDA has reviewed and approved the safety of no-calorie sweeteners for everyone, including people with diabetes.3

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Studies have shown that no-calorie sweeteners do not cause the sugar levels in your blood to rise. However, other ingredients in foods containing no-calorie sweeteners may have effects on blood sugar, so it’s important to look at food labels to understand the total calories and carbohydrate.3

THE TALE:

No-calorie sweeteners may cause you to crave sweets.

THE TRUTH:

No-calorie sweeteners do not lead to increased sugar cravings.4

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In fact, a recent study found that, when drinking diet soda sweetened with no-calorie sweeteners, participants actually reduced their consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, coffee and tea with sugar, and desserts. Another study found that people who enjoyed diet soda over regular soda made more nutritious purchases at the grocery store.4

THE TALE:

No-calorie sweeteners can cause you to gain weight.

THE TRUTH:

Consuming no-calorie sweeteners in place of sugar saves calories and does not cause increased appetite or weight gain. In fact, doing so may even help you lose weight.5,6

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Research has shown that some products containing no-calorie sweeteners may actually help to whittle your waistline. One short-term clinical trial found that participants who replaced caloric beverages with those containing nocalorie sweeteners saw average weight losses of 2%-2.5%. Additionally, in a 12-week weight loss study, researchers found that people who consumed lowcalorie beverages lost more weight than the group that drank only water.5,6

*Like other no-calorie sweeteners on the market, SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated and Packets contain small amounts of carbohydrate (less than 1 gram per serving) that provide needed volume and texture. These common food ingredients, which include maltodextrin and/or dextrose, add so few calories per serving that all SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener Products meet the Food and Drug Administration’s criteria for no-calorie foods (<5 calories/serving).

REFERENCES: 1. Fitch C, Keim KS. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Use of Nutritive and Nonnutritive Sweeteners. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012;112:739-758. 2. American Diabetes Association. Nutrition
recommendations and interventions for diabetes: a position statement of the American Diabetes Association.
Diabetes Care. 2008;31(Suppl 1):S61-S78. 3. Evert AB, Boucher JL, Cypress M, et al. Nutrition therapy
recommendations for the management of adults with diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2014;37(Suppl 1):S120-S143.
4. Piernas C, Tate D, Wang X, Popkin BM. Does diet-beverage intake affect dietary consumption patterns?
Results from the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial. Am J Clin
Nutr. 2013;97:604-611. 5. Tate DF, Turner-McGrievy G, Lyons E, et al. Replacing caloric beverages with water
or diet beverages for weight loss in adults: main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday
(CHOICE) randomized clinical trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;95:555-563. 6. Peters JC, Wyatt HR, Foster GD, et
al. The effects of water and non-nutritive sweetened beverages on weight loss during a 12-week weight loss
treatment program. Obesity. 2014;22(6):1415-1421. 7. Gardner C, Wylie-Rosett J, Gidding SS, et al. Nonnutritive
sweeteners: current use and health perspectives: a scientifi c statement from the American Heart Association and
the American Diabetes Association. Circulation. 2012;126:509-519.



© McNeil Nutritionals, LLC 2014 SPL-4321

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