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The Media Center is your source for the latest foodservice news from the SPLENDA® Brand. Press releases and updates will be posted here as soon as they become available, so check back often. To view older releases, please visit our archives.

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The Media Center is your source for the latest foodservice news from the SPLENDA® Brand. Press releases and updates will be posted here as soon as they become available, so check back often. To view older releases, please visit our archives.

June 28, 2016

Drinking Beverages Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweeteners is Associated with Healthier Diets and Overall Lower Calorie Consumption

Recent Study Reveals That Drinking Low-Calorie Sweetened Beverages Does Not Increase Intake of Sugary Foods

A recent study has confirmed previous research findings that the consumption of beverages sweetened with low-calorie sweeteners is associated with healthier diets and overall lower calorie consumption. The study by Gibson et al., recently published in Nutrients, suggests that using low-calorie sweetened beverages can support a healthy eating pattern.[1]

The review was based on an analysis of detailed dietary records from 1,590 adults who participated in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS), the most authoritative source of dietary habits and nutrient intake of the UK population. Food intake data was entered by trained diet coders, and data was analyzed using an established foods databank at the noted UK MRC Human Nutrition Research Unit at Cambridge University. From these results, the researchers concluded that non-consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages (NC) and consumers of low-calorie beverages (LCB) tend to have higher-quality diets compared to either consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) or consumers of both SSB and LCB. The data suggest that LCB consumers eat more fruit, vegetables and fish, and eat less meat, meat products, chips, white bread and sugar, than consumers of SSB.

In addition, the researchers determined that the NC and LCB consumers “do not compensate for sugar or energy deficits by consuming more sugary foods.” [1] Consumers of LCB had a significantly lower energy intake (1719 kcal/day) compared to consumers of SSB (1958 kcal/day) and consumers of both SSB and LCB (1986 kcal/day). LCB consumers also had a mean total energy intake (1719 kcal/ day) that was almost identical to the total energy intake of non-consumers (1718 kcal/day).

This analysis supports previous studies which have shown that consumption of diet drinks, when substituted for caloric beverages, is associated with lower calorie and lower added sugar intake overall (as opposed to perpetuating a desire for sugary foods) and, therefore, can be a useful tool for weight management.[2] [3] [4] The authors of this latest study explained, “LCB provide a palatable source of water with minimal sugar and energy content. Their caloric benefits derive from their role as substitutes for SSB and meta-analyses have demonstrated that replacing SSB with LCB leads to reduced caloric intake and modest weight loss.” [1]

A 2014 review of the 1999-2008 data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey also found that consumption of low-calorie sweeteners is related to higher diet quality and overall healthier lifestyle. The analysis, conducted by Drewnowski and Rehm, found that use of low-calorie sweeteners, including the consumption of sugar-free beverages, was associated with higher healthy eating index scores, less smoking and more physical activity.[5] Similarly, research by Sigman-Grant and Hsieh found that people who use low-calorie, sugar-free foods and beverages have better quality diets.[6]

“In light of the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ recommendation to adopt healthy eating patterns, this recent study provides further support that low-calorie sweeteners can be a useful tool in dietary strategies to lower excess weight, and their use can be associated with improved diet quality,” said Maureen Conway, MBA, MA, RD, LDN, FAND, Director of Nutrition and Professional Affairs for Heartland Food Products Group, the maker of SPLENDA® Sweetener Products. “Since summer is a time when sugary beverages are heavily consumed, beverages made with low-calorie sweeteners, such as SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, are a great way to reduce excess calorie intake from added sugars that could contribute to weight gain,” Conway added.

The study researchers also remark in their conclusions that “maintaining good diet quality during weight loss is important in order to meet nutrient requirements at a lower energy intake.”[1] Conway notes that this is an important point, and that easy-to-accomplish changes in lifestyle, like using low-calorie sweeteners instead of sugar, could make other changes, like focusing on a better quality diet, easier to embrace.

For more information about low-calorie sweeteners,please visit splendaliving.com. For more information about SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, visit www.splenda.com.

Sucralose, the sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, has been used safely by millions of people around the world for more than 20 years, supported by research data from more than 100 studies. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) support the use of low calorie sweeteners such as sucralose as a useful tool in weight management and diabetes. For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA Brand, visit blog.splenda.com/. You can also follow the SPLENDA® Brand on Tumblr, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

# # #


[1]Gibson SA et al. Nutrients 2016 Jan 2;8(1). pii: E9. doi: 10.3390/nu8010009.

[2]Bellisle F. Curr Obes Rep 2015; 4(1),:106-10

[3]Rogers PJ et al. Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Sep 14. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2015.177

[4]Miller PE and Perez V. Am J Clin Nutr 2014; 100(3): 765-77

[5]Drewnowski, A. and Rehm, C.D. Nutrients 2014; 6: 4389–4403

[6]Sigman-Grant, M. J. and Hsieh, G. (2005), Reported Use of Reduced-sugar Foods and Beverages Reflect High-quality Diets. Journal of Food Science, 70: S42–S46. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2005.tb09063.x

January 25, 2016

SPLENDA Brand - America’s Favorite Sweetener

The Only Low-Calorie Sweetener That is 100% American Made and Manufactured

CARMEL, Ind.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS) released the 2015 – 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and one of the Key Recommendations of the guidelines is to limit added sugars to less than 10 percent of total calories per day. As the DGA additionally affirms the safety of no-calorie sweeteners for the general population, it is important to note that no-calorie sweeteners can be a helpful strategy in individualized meal planning for reaching and maintaining a healthy weight.

“As America’s #1 low-calorie sweetener, the SPLENDA Brand is committed to helping Americans achieve a healthy, balanced lifestyle by enabling people to experience the joy and taste of sugar without all of the calories,” said Ted Gelov, Chairman & CEO at TC Heartland, LLC, makers of SPLENDA. “We are also proud to say that SPLENDA No Calorie Sweetener packets and granulated products, manufactured by Heartland, are the only low-calorie tabletop sweeteners that are 100% American made and manufactured. We provide jobs for Americans and source all ingredients in the United States,” Gelov added.

This statement comes in light of news that sweetener suppliers in China are dumping their inventories of sucralose into the U.S. at prices that are below market value, actions which may lead to an anti-dumping lawsuit against these manufacturers.

“Consumers are ordering SPLENDA in restaurants and some are being served a yellow packet that they are being told is SPLENDA. It’s not SPLENDA unless it says SPLENDA. Americans deserve to know that not all yellow packets are the same. Choose the brand you trust and always ask for SPLENDA by name,” said Gelov.

Millions of Americans use SPLENDA every day to support a balanced, healthy lifestyle, and SPLENDA is proud to be an American brand. In fact, to highlight this, the brand will be launching a limited-edition SPLENDA packet, complete with stars and stripes, which consumers will be able to find in stores starting in June, just in time for the July 4th holiday.

For more information, and for tips, tricks and ways to achieve a balanced lifestyle, visit www.SweetSwaps.com or www.Splenda.com.

About SPLENDA Sweetener Products

Sucralose, the sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA Sweetener Products, has been used safely by millions of people around the world for more than 20 years, supported by research data from more than 100 studies. For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA Brand, visit blog.splenda.com. You can also follow the SPLENDA Brand on Tumblr, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

END

Contacts

For SPLENDA
Media:

Melissa Newman, (212) 243-8320
[email protected]

September 1, 2015

Research Confirms Cutting Back on Added Sugars Can Be a Successful Tool in Losing Excess Weight

Whether you’re having a backyard BBQ, pool party or beach picnic, it’s important to be mindful of how much added sugar is in the beverages and foods you and your guests are enjoying. On average, Americans consume a whopping 22 teaspoons of added sugars per day—nearly three times the lower daily limit recently recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO suggests reducing the intake of added sugars to less than 10% of total energy intake, and that reducing to below 5% or roughly six teaspoons or less per day would provide additional health benefits.[1] In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is currently considering new regulations to include the amount of added sugars on our food labels.  Excess sugar consumption has been linked to obesity in the U.S. and globally.

Click-to-Tweet feature: Check out this new infographic to see how consumers can cut down on added sugar with these easy swaps! https://goo.gl/ZEPHo3 #SweetSwaps

 “Many consumers underestimate the amount of added sugars in the foods and beverages they eat every day,” says Maureen Conway, MBA, MA, RD, LDN, FAND, Director of Nutritional Affairs, McNeil Nutritionals, LLC. “Limiting added sugars in your daily diet can be a helpful tool in controlling calorie intake, which is important to consider for weight management. Many studies show that excess weight gain can lead to obesity and increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and other serious health conditions, like cardiovascular disease. Low calorie sweeteners, like SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, are a great option to help reduce the amount of added sugars in our diet while still satisfying sweet taste.”

An analysis of national survey data  by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) shows that the average American consumes more than double the upper daily limit of added sugar (full analysis here).[2] 

The American Heart Association (AHA) recognizes the importance of heart-healthy meal-planning, including ways to help reduce added sugars intake. Since 2009, the American Heart Association (AHA) has recommended an added sugar intake of not more than six teaspoons (100 calories) per day for women and not more than nine teaspoons (150 calories) per day for men.[3]

The SPLENDA® Brand is a proud supporter of Simple Cooking with HeartTM , from the American Heart Association, which provides tasteful, easy tips for a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and other valuable nutrients that are lower in sodium, cholesterol, saturated and trans fats. Simple Cooking with Heart™ provides families with information, cooking know-how and recipes for affordable and nutritious meals that can be made at home. This can help Americans reduce their added sugar intake while not sacrificing taste. Check out this infographic for easy ideas on how to cut back on added sugars.

 “Sweets are naturally liked and having a healthy diet doesn’t mean we have to completely give up sweets,” says Conway. “However, moderation is key. The Simple Cooking with HeartTM program from the American Heart Association provides tasteful, easy tips for a diet lower in added sugars and higher in fiber and other wholesome nutrients for healthier meals.”

Try these Simple Cooking with Heart™ recipes, from the American Heart Association™, which are lower-sugar tasty ideas for your next party platter.

  • Raspberry Basil Iced Tea – Enjoy this refreshing drink that reduces calories by swapping full sugar for SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener

For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA® Brand, visit www.splendaliving.com.

ABOUT SPLENDA® Sweetener Products

Sucralose, the sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, has been used safely by millions of people around the world for more than 20 years, supported by research data from more than 100 studies. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) support the use of low calorie sweeteners such as sucralose as a useful tool in weight management and diabetes. For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA® Brand, visit www.splendaliving.com. You can also follow the SPLENDA® Brand on Tumblr, Facebook, and Instagram.

# # #

Links to third-party websites are provided solely for convenience. McNeil Nutritionals, LLC is not responsible for the content of such websites, and users are solely responsible for compliance with any terms of use thereon.


[1] World Health Organization. (2015). WHO calls on countries to reduce sugars intake among adults and children. Geneva, Switzerland.

[2] United States Department of Agriculture. (2014). Americans consume more than double the recommended maximum of added sugars. http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/chart-gallery/detail.aspx?chartId=49231&ref=collection#.VDfyGfnF8eo.

[3] Johnson, Rachel K., et. al. 2009, August 24. Dietary Sugars Intake and Cardiovascular Health. A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

August 25, 2015

Life is Sweet with Easy Sugar Swaps

POSTED BY:

Maureen Conway, MBA, MA, RD, LDN

Original Post HERE

When was the last time you thought about the amount of added sugars in your diet?

Studies show that most Americans eat more than twice the amount of added sugar than is recommended for a healthy lifestyle. Excess sugar intake can contribute to excess weight gain, and being overweight may increase the risk of developing serious health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease. The SPLENDA Brand is proud to support the American Heart Association’s Simple Cooking with Heart™, which provides tasteful, easy tips for a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and other valuable nutrients that are lower in sodium, cholesterol, saturated and trans fats. Simple Cooking with Heart™ provides families with information, cooking know-how and recipes for affordable and nutritious meals that can be made at home. These simple swaps can help you and your family reduce added sugar intake without sacrificing the great flavors you enjoy.

Check out this infographic (pdf version) to see how you and your family can cut down on added sugars with these easy swaps! (Note: a downloadable image of the infographic also appears here.)

June 22, 2015

The Sweet Side of Summer Beverages

POSTED BY:

Maureen Conway, MBA, MA, RD, LDN

Original Post HERE

Have you ever given thought to your summer beverage habits?

Like barbeques and beach getaways, lemonade stands and tall glasses of iced tea are summer staples. As we enter the season of sweet, fruity beverages, now more than ever, we’re conscious of the added sugar and calories we’re drinking. With the average American consuming over the daily recommended amount of full sugar, low-calorie sweeteners offer a way to sweeten your cup without all of the added sugar. No wonder 95% of survey respondents would consider using a low calorie sweetener when making large batches of summer beverages!

Check out this infographic (pdf version) for more enlightening facts and to see how your beverage behavior compares! (Note: a downloadable image of the infographic also appears here.)

Try some of these SPLENDA Brand summer recipes to start cutting added sugars from beverages today including Peach Flavored Green Tea Punch, Cantaloupe Agua Fresca, and Gingery Lemonade.

April 30, 2015

Report Confirms Low Calorie Sweeteners Can Be an Important Tool for People with Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 40% of Americans will develop diabetes at some point in their lives. It is estimated that 29.1 million people in the U.S. currently have diabetes and another 86 million American adults have pre-diabetes. And, nine out of 10 people with pre-diabetes don’t even know they have it.  A healthy eating pattern, regular physical activity and often medication are key components to managing diabetes.

For those who have diabetes, or are at risk for developing it, low calorie sweeteners can be an important tool in reducing added sugars and carbohydrate intake, according to a review published in US Endocrinology (full review here). In the review, researchers at Baylor University School of Medicine confirm that low calorie sweeteners, such as sucralose, the sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, can be a safe and effective tool to help people with diabetes manage their calorie and carbohydrate intake and may facilitate weight management1. The authors find that low calorie sweeteners "can serve an important role in diabetes prevention and management" and that they provide patients with diabetes "considerable flexibility in their health goals and personal dietary preferences."

The publication highlights that low calorie sweeteners, when used to reduce sugar intake, offer a practical method for facilitating a reduction in both calorie and carbohydrate intake. Studies show that intake of added sugars can add significant calories and carbohydrate to the daily diet: The average American adult consumes 22 teaspoons of added sugars a day (a whopping 352 calories, as easy as drinking two and a half cans of soda) and teens consume even more—an average of about 34 teaspoons (544 calories!) a day2. The authors report that reducing excessive sugar intake, by using low calorie sweeteners, "can be a preventative measure to combat excessive weight gain in at-risk individuals."

"Developing a plan to manage your health whether you are pre-diabetic or have diabetes can have long lasting benefits," says V. Lee Grotz, Director, R&D Fellow, McNeil Nutritionals, LLC. "Meal planning is a specific part of the recommended therapy for pre-diabetes and diabetes management, and this can include making better food choices.  Swapping out full sugar for SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, drinking water instead of full-calorie soda or juice, and eating the right amount of fruits and veggies everyday—instead of high-calorie snacks—are all ways that may help with managing both calorie and carbohydrate intake.  These examples are all simple and easy lifestyle choices that people with diabetes can make to achieve a healthy eating pattern."

Sucralose, the no calorie ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, is not sugar and the body does not recognize it as such. Unlike sugar, sucralose is not broken down for energy. It is not a source of carbohydrate or glucose, and clinical studies have shown it has no effect on blood glucose levels, insulin secretion or blood levels, glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), or blood glucose control.

For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA® Brand, visit www.splendaliving.com. To view a video on the key benefits of sucralose produced by Calorie Control Council visit, http://goo.gl/6ldzrd.

# # #

1Johnston, Craig A., Stevens, Brian, BSc and Foreyt, John P., PhD. (2013). The Role of Low-Calorie Sweeteners in Diabetes. Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine. Houston, Texas.

2Johnson, Rachel K. et al. (2009) Dietary Sugars Intake and Cardiovascular Health. A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. Dallas, Texas.

Links to third-party websites are provided solely for convenience. McNeil Nutritionals, LLC is not responsible for the content of such websites, and users are solely responsible for compliance with any terms of use thereon.

March 3, 2015

New Report Suggests Using Low Calorie Sweeteners can Suppress Appetite and Aids in Weight Loss

Studies find using low calorie sweeteners tends to reduce intake of sugar-containing foods

Spring is right around the corner and many people are looking for ways to kick-start their diet and get into shape for the summer months ahead. Swapping full sugar for low calorie sweeteners is a great way to reduce calories in your recipe repertoire or beverage of choice. However, some people question whether consuming low calorie sweeteners can increase or decrease appetites for sweets.

Now, a new paper published in Current Obesity Reports  found research does not support that low calorie sweeteners—like sucralose, the sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products—can cause sweet cravings or an increased appetite for sweet1. In fact, the publication highlights clinical trials in both children and adults suggest using low calorie sweeteners tends to reduce rather than increase intake of sugar-containing foods and their use may assist in weight loss.

The paper reports that various low calorie sweeteners, which have been used for decades, enables consumers to enjoy the palatable sweet taste of their favorite foods and beverages without all the energy load of sugar. These ingredients have a very high sweetening power compared to sugar, so they can be used in small amounts to achieve the desired level of sweetness to foods and drinks, while contributing very little or no energy to the final product.

“Low calorie sweeteners like SPLENDA® Sweetener Products have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other global authorities as safe to use in foods and beverages and can be found in thousands of products around the world,” says Michelle Harrington, MS, RD, LDN, Manager, Regulatory Affairs, McNeil Nutritionals, LLC. “This new research paper helps to unravel the myths around low calorie sweeteners. The research supports that low calorie sweeteners likely help decrease appetite, rather than increase, intake of sugar-sweetened foods and can be a helpful tool in weight loss planning.”

One example of a recent study highlighted in the new paper is a randomized clinical trial by JC Peters, and fellow researchers, which evaluated the effect of sugar-free beverages or water during a 12-week weight loss treatment program2. People in the low calorie sweetened beverage group had a higher weight loss and reported feeling less hungry.

“Reducing calories, eating healthy foods and exercising are the three most common lifestyle changes that most people follow when managing their weight,” Harrington says. “If you’re looking to jump start your diet, these studies suggest using low calorie sweeteners helps to reduce calories from full sugar and assists in weight loss.”

For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA Brand, visit www.splendaliving.com.

ABOUT SPLENDA®

Sucralose, the sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, has been used safely by millions of people around the world for more than 20 years, supported by research data from more than 100 studies. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) support the use of low calorie sweeteners such as sucralose as a useful tool in weight management and diabetes. For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA® Brand, visit www.splendaliving.com. You can also follow the SPLENDA® Brand on Tumblr, Facebook, and Instagram.

# # #

1Bellisle, France. (2015). Intense Sweeteners, Appetite for the Sweet Taste, and Relationship to Weight Management. Springer Science & Business Media, New York.

2Peters, JC, Wyatt HR, Foster GD, Pan A, Wojtanowski AC, Vander Veur SS, et al. The effects of water and non-nutritive sweetened beverages on weight loss during a 12-week weight loss treatment program. Obesity. 2014; 22:1415-21.

Links to third-party websites are provided solely for convenience. McNeil Nutritionals, LLC is not responsible for the content of such websites, and users are solely responsible for compliance with any terms of use thereon.

June 23, 2015

Consumers Know Drinking Too Many Sugary Beverages This Summer Can Cause Weight Gain

Scientific review also finds beverages with low calorie sweeteners can help with long-term weight management

Summer is a great time for backyard cookouts and cold, refreshing drinks, but the calories from all of those sugary beverages can really add up. Drinking too many sugary beverages has become an “intractable public health concern,” as noted in a recent review of studies on the use of lower calorie beverages (full review here published in Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics).[1] On average, a 12 fluid ounce can of a full-calorie soda or ice tea drink has about nine teaspoons of added sugar and 140 calories.[2] For the average adult, this is about 5-10% of the recommended total daily calorie intake.[3]

Results of a new CrowdTap survey that the SPLENDA® Brand conducted helps demonstrate how consumers feel about sugary beverages. The SPLENDA® Brand surveyed 500 respondents across the U.S. to find out how they prefer to drink beverages during the summer. “We wanted to better understand consumer perceptions about added sugar intake and summer beverage habits,” said Maureen Conway, MBA, MA, RD, LDN, Director of Nutritional Affairs, McNeil Nutritionals, LLC. “The average American adult consumes significantly more added sugar than what is recommended by health authorities, and this can contribute to weight gain. In the survey we conducted, we found that about half of the responders know that sugar-sweetened beverages can have high amounts of added sugar. We also found that almost 90% would take what they drink into account when considering long-term weight management.  Importantly, the data also indicate that low calorie sweeteners are definitely a consideration for consumers when making big batches of summer beverages to have on hand, ready to serve.”  To view the full infographic of the survey results, visit https://goo.gl/DmOl2n.

Click-to-Tweet this infographic: http://ctt.ec/aetn0

With consumers thinking more about the impact of added sugar in their summer drinks, the recent review of scientific studies published by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics on sugar-sweetened beverages offers additional helpful insights.  The review, authored by nutrition and obesity experts from several different universities, shows that replacing those drinks with lower calorie alternatives, including drinks sweetened with no-calorie sweeteners, such as sucralose, the sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, may have “beneficial effects on long-term body weight management.”[4] This shows how small lifestyle changes may result in long term benefits.

More than two-thirds of the U.S. population is now overweight and the average person consumes about 22 teaspoons of added sugar per day – and most of that comes from sugar-sweetened beverages, according to the American Heart Association.[5] Lowering added sugar intake is also recommended by health and government associations such as the USDA.

“There have been conflicting studies published on the role of low calorie sweeteners specifically on diet soda and weight gain,” says Conway. “This new review intentionally addresses questions on the use of low calorie beverages in weight management. It confirms that replacing added sugar with low calorie sweeteners can be an important tool for many in plans for weight management, including weight loss strategies.  As consumers look for better ways to reduce added sugars to help with weight management, beverages made with SPLENDA® Sweetener Products can be a refreshing option with minimal calories.”

 Try some of these SPLENDA® Brand summer recipes to start cutting added sugars from beverages today including:

Peach Flavored Green Tea Punch

Cantaloupe Agua Fresca

Gingery Lemonade

Sucralose, the no calorie ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, is not sugar and the body does not recognize it as such. Unlike sugar, sucralose is not broken down for energy. It is not a source of carbohydrate or glucose, and clinical studies have shown it has no effect on blood glucose levels, insulin secretion or blood levels, glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), or blood glucose control.

For more information about sucralose or the SPLENDA® Brand, visit www.splendaliving.com.

Links to third-party websites are provided solely for convenience. McNeil Nutritionals, LLC is not responsible for the content of such websites, and users are solely responsible for compliance with any terms of use thereon.


[1] Zheng, M. et. al. (2015) Substitution of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages with Other Beverage Alternatives: A Review of Long-Term Health Outcomes.

[2] United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 27. Web. 17 June 2015. http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/4258?manu=&fgcd.

[3] United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). ChooseMyPlate.gov. Empty Calories. Web. 17 June 2015. http://www.choosemyplate.gov/weight-management-calories/calories/empty-calories-amount.html

[4] Zheng, M. et. al. (2015) Substitution of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages with Other Beverage Alternatives: A Review of Long-Term Health Outcomes.

[5] Rachel K. Johnson, PhD, MPH, RD, et. al. (2015) Dietary Sugars InTake and Cardiovascular Health. A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association.

March 18, 2014

STUDY FINDS SUCRALOSE, SWEETENING INGREDIENT IN SPLENDA® SWEETENER PRODUCTS, HAS SAME EFFECT AS WATER ON THE BODY

Results Add to Evidence that SPLENDA® is Safe for People with Diabetes

Consuming sucralose in a drink is shown to have the same effect as water on a person’s sugar and insulin levels, according to a study reported in Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association1. Sucralose is the no calorie sweetening ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products.

The study was led by Tongzhi Wu, MD, PhD, at the University of Adelaide School of Medicine, and funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council in Australia. The results showed that neither sucralose alone, or when combined with another no calorie sweetener, acesulfame potassium (AceK), had any effect on insulin secretion or blood sugar.

In the study, Wu and his team followed ten healthy men who drank four different drinks on four different occasions after an overnight fast. The four drinks were water; water with sucralose; water with AceK; and water with both sucralose and AceK. Ten minutes later each one drank a sugar solution.

The participant’s sugar, insulin, and GLP-1 blood levels were measured before, and for four hours after, drinking the sugar solution. (GLP-1 is a hormone known to slow gastric emptying and has a role in appetite regulation.) The results showed no differences in outcomes for any of these measures, whether the men drank plain water, or water sweetened with either or both sweeteners. It should be noted that using all men in such a study is a way to minimize the possibility of effects unrelated to testing. For example, hormonal changes that can occur with menstruation can influence insulin levels2,3 .

“Our findings are … consistent with previous reports…” the authors state, and they concluded that “… sucralose and AceK, either alone or in combination, have no acute effect on gastric emptying, GLP-1, or glycemic responses after oral glucose in healthy humans.”

In their comments in Diabetes Care1, Dr. Wu and colleagues point out that a previous study reported that drinking diet soda increased GLP-1 levels. This result was further interpreted to mean that the artificial sweeteners could potentially impact metabolism and increase a person’s sugar levels.

In contrast, Dr. Wu noted that, “The design of that study was, however, suboptimal, as the diet soda contained a number of substances (including caramel color, gum acacia, natural flavors, citric acid, potassium benzoate, phosphoric acid, and potassium citrate) that were not controlled for.” Consequently, Dr. Wu and his team chose to give participant’s in their study sweeteners in water to avoid the potential effect of these other substances on glucose, insulin or GLP-1.

“The Wu study provides more evidence that SPLENDA® can be used safely by everyone, including pregnant women, children and people with diabetes,” says Maureen Conway, R.D., Director of Nutritional Affairs for McNeil Nutritionals, LLC. “This is especially meaningful for people with diabetes and their caregivers. Foods and beverages sweetened with SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener can be a great way for people to enjoy the foods they love as part of their diabetes meal plan. And using SPLENDA® with regular physical activity can be an excellent way to help with weight management.”

Sucralose, the no calorie ingredient in SPLENDA® Sweetener Products, is not sugar and the body does not recognize it as such. Unlike sugar, sucralose is not broken down for energy. It is not a source of carbohydrate or glucose, and clinical studies have shown it has no effect on blood glucose levels, insulin secretion or blood levels, glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), or blood glucose control.

SPLENDA® Sweetener Products have been used safely by millions of people around the world for more than 20 years, supported by research data from more than 110 studies. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) support the use of low calorie sweeteners such as sucralose as a useful tool in managing weight and diabetes. For more information, visit www.splenda.com or www.foodinsight.org.

END

1 Wu T, Bound MJ, Standfield SD, Bellon M, Young RL, Jones KL, Horowitz M, Rayner CK. Artificial sweeteners have no effect on gastric emptying, glucagon-like peptide-1, or glycemia after oral glucose in healthy humans. Diabetes Care, 2013. 36: e202-e203. (Available at: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/36/12/e202.full )

2Brennan IM, Feltrin KL, Nair NS, Hausken T, Little TJ, Gentilcore D, Wishart JM, Jones KL, Horowitz M , Feinle-Bisset C.
Effects of the phases of the menstrual cycle on gastric emptying, glycemia, plasma GLP-1 and insulin, and energy intake in healthy lean women. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2009. 297:G602-610. (Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19556358)

3Schisterman EF, Mumford SL, Sjaarda LA. Failure to consider the menstrual cycle phase may cause misinterpretation of clinical and research findings of cardiometabolic biomarkers in premenopausal women. Epidemiol Rev. 2014. 36:71-82. (Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24042431)

May 13, 2014

NEW REVIEW OF STUDIES ON LOW CALORIE SWEETENERS FINDS POSITIVE IMPACT ON WEIGHT LOSS, WAIST SIZE AND BODY FAT

Presentation at Experimental Biology 2014 Highlights Abstract

The role of low calorie sweeteners (LCS) in weight management and appetite has been a topic of growing public interest in recent years. Now, a new analysis of research spanning 35 years finds that replacing sugar with low calorie sweeteners helps people lose weight, reduce waist size and decrease body fat. Importantly, the analysis also shows that low calorie sweeteners do not cause weight gain.

"As overweight and obesity-related health conditions include cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer, it's critical to identify strategies that help facilitate weight loss or weight maintenance," says Vanessa Perez, Ph.D., who presented the study abstract at the annual meeting of Experimental Biology, a multidisciplinary scientific meeting.1,2 "Based on the gold standard study design in medical research - the randomized controlled trial - the results show that using low calorie sweeteners resulted in statistically significant reductions in body weight, BMI, fat mass, and waist circumference."

Dr. Perez and her colleague, Paige E. Miller, Ph.D., M.P.H., conducted a meta-analysis of published studies dating back to 1976. Meta-analysis, a statistical technique that quantitatively combines the findings from multiple, independent studies, was used to assess the effectiveness of low-calorie sweeteners. The benefits of meta-analysis include a consolidated and quantitative review of the large, often complex, and sometimes conflicting body of research.

"Conflicting research on low calorie sweeteners and body weight have led to some debate about the relationship between low calorie sweeteners and body weight," says Dr. Perez, a Managing Scientist at the Center for Epidemiology and Computational Biology, Exponent, Inc. "Using meta-analysis techniques, we evaluated 15 randomized controlled trials and nine prospective observational cohort studies to examine the relationship between low calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition.

"Data from the randomized controlled trials indicate that substituting low calorie sweeteners in place of sugar does not cause weight gain and may be a useful tool in helping people comply with their weight loss and weight management plans," Dr. Perez explains. "The results also show that use of these sweeteners resulted in a modest, but statistically significant, reduction in all outcomes examined, including body weight, fat mass and waist circumference. Additionally, the results do not support recent hypotheses that low calorie sweeteners increase appetite and sweet cravings."

Dr. Perez and her colleague also evaluated results from prospective observational cohort studies, which showed inconsistent results. The authors note that these studies are limited and difficult to interpret because few observational studies adequately account for potential factors that could impact the outcome, such as a person's diet and other lifestyle practices.

Dr. Perez noted that, while past reviews of low calorie sweeteners and weight control have been published, the present meta-analysis is the most comprehensive scientific evaluation to date of low calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition. The complete study has been accepted for publication later this year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN). The research was funded by the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI )3.

Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) support the use of low calorie sweeteners such as sucralose as a useful tool in managing weight and diabetes. SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener Products (sucralose) have been used safely by millions of people around the world for more than 20 years, supported by research data from more than 110 studies.

"Leading nutrition and health experts recommend a balanced approach to weight loss and weight management, including healthy eating plans, portion control and increasing physical activity ," says Lee Grotz, Ph. D. , Director of Medical Affairs, McNeil Nutritionals, LLC. "SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener can be an easy way to help reduce the daily intake of calories and carbohydrate from added sugars – without sacrificing taste. It's one of many small changes people can make in their daily routines that can add up to meaningful changes in their weight management efforts over time."

For more information about SPLENDA, visit www.splenda.com or www.foodinsight.org.

END

1 Experimental Biology is a multidisciplinary scientific meeting sponsored by six societies from professionals in the fields of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and pathology, nutrition and pharmacology. The 2014 meeting was held April 26-30 in San Diego, CA

2http://bit.ly/1suHVYc
Miller, PE, Perez, V., (2014) Low-calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and prospective cohorts. FASEB J., 28, 391.1.

3 All opinions, findings, and conclusions made herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of ILSI North America or any other organization or agency

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